Articles2020-11-04T16:50:15+11:00

THE MAKING EFFECT

The Impact of Arts in Health

An online exhibition on the role the Arts play in the process of recovery

Virtual Exhibition / Speaker Series / Discussion Forum

NOVEMBER 2020

Speakers
Works

THE MAKING EFFECT

The Impact of Arts in Health

An online exhibition on the role the Arts play in the process of recovery

Virtual Exhibition / Speaker Series / Discussion Forum

NOVEMBER 2020

Speakers
Works

THE MAKING EFFECT ONLINE EXHIBITION

ABOUT THE MAKING EFFECT

What role can the Arts play in the process of recovery? For the month of November, the Arts Health Network (AHNNA) is hosting an online exhibition here and social media. Works and artists' stories will be posted daily, exploring how the process of making art has influenced their own journey of recovery.

Read more...

By |Tags: |

TME #32: ‘Crazy Wall – a work in progress’, Elaine Paton

Elaine is a writer, director and performer, who came to Australia from Wales in 1980 to join a theatre company. Elaine has returned to Wales over time and we have already seen in this exhibition the artistic output of one of those return journeys in her video ‘Moment(o)s Of Leaving’, set in the former Psychiatric Hospital, Whitchurch. Elaine considers her work as an artist to “live at the intersection of art and mental health.” In this work in progress, ‘Crazy Wall’, Elaine investigates connectedness, isolation and identity.

By |Tags: |

TME SPEAKER SERIES: Niki Read on ‘Art, Death & Dying’

Niki Read of The Groundswell Project talks about social aspects of death and dying and how art acts as a way to access difficult conversations about quality of life in death, and quality of bereavement. She discusses the Creative Legacy Project in times of COVID and how it supports people receiving palliative care, family members and staff. “Art opens up spaces for people to enter into”.

By |Tags: |

TME #31: ‘The Burden of Proof/Everything Important is Invisible’, Michelle Jersky

Michelle Jersky is the Program Manager: Arts in Health and Community Development at Sydney Children’s Hospitals Network (Randwick). From 2009-2019 she facilitated the Ngala Nanga Mai pARenT Group Program in La Perouse – the program is now coordinated by an Aboriginal Health Worker, previously a group participant. She creates art as part of her professional practice and identity as a woman, mother, and feminist.

By |Tags: |

TME #29: ‘Wonky Duck’, Maree Hackett

Maree Hackett is a Professor, Program Head, Mental Health, with the George Institute of Global Health and an occasional artist. As a researcher, she studies depression, stroke and other chronic illnesses. As an artist she mostly draws with dots (pointillism), but sometimes sketches and paints.

By |Tags: |

TME #28: ‘Roberta Shepherd, AO’, Michael Simms

Michael Simms is a multi-award-winning artist based in Sydney, whose work is characterized by dream-like depictions of the human figure. Ranging from traditional portraiture to explorations of identity in the digital age and queer culture, his diverse paintings and drawings combine elements of classicism, romanticism, surrealism and psychology.

By |Tags: |

TME #27: jorvn jones’ infinity loop presents: jorvn jones’ silla de ruedas: “Bastinado Beats”

jorvn jones is an Artist, writer, performer, composer, dancer and auteur who works across cultures to explore evolving Masculinities, including third gender, non-binary, ‘in spandula’ and ‘iiS’. His (Y’all) work is personal and poetic, and iiS. “Bastinado Beats” was a dance piece in response to his in residence at Paringa mental health facility in Sydney’s West.

By |Tags: |

TME #26: ‘Happy Memories’, Yusra Alkeswani

Yusra Alkeswani participated in the Groundswell Project and Liverpool Hospital’s partnership program, delivered by artists in the palliative care ward. Our Creative Legacy Program is an award-winning arts and health experience that combines storytelling and art making on an acute Palliative Care ward. Through conversation and story-telling exercises the artist captures the life stories of people in the last days and weeks of their life in personalised artworks, which are then given to the patient and their family as a gift of art and legacy. 

By |Tags: |

TME #25: ‘Looking In Looking Out’, Kress Lagudi

Kress Lagudi's work evolved through the use of textiles; with an emphasis on patterns, textures & colours. Now it is in the form of paint and she is currently exploring the themes of gardens. These two works come from her participation in Liverpool Hospital’s “Our Creative Legacy Program”, a palliative care initiative involving patients, their memories and artists. Kress addressed staff concerns rather than those of patients. She asked a series of questions about the staff’s experience of lockdown. Staff members recorded their experiences and Kress created these works from their responses.

By |Tags: |

TME #24: ‘Grief Selfportrait’, Armelle Swan MFA

Armelle Swan is a Sydney based artist specialising in painting. She has a BFA (Hons I) and MFA from Sydney College of the Arts, University of Sydney. Formerly an emergency nurse, she gave up that career in the ‘90s to focus on her art; however, she considers her experiences in that role were seminal for later thinking and making. So, she brings to bear scholarly interests, such as the nexus of art and health in notions of visual thinking, brain, mind and neurology, to any making.

By |Tags: |

TME #23: ‘And Now That Can’t Hurt Me Anymore’, Guy James Whitworth

Guy is a British writer and visual artist now resident in Australia. Primarily a portrait artist, Guy has also completed both architectural and landscape commissions. Guy’s solo exhibitions have been a huge hit with both the public, collectors and critics, with ABC online calling him ‘one of the most promising and collectible artists’ around at the moment. Over the past few years Guy has also turned to documentary film, making “A Queer Aesthetic” to promote his work and his message. Guy’s first book, Signs of a Struggle was published by Clouds of Magellan Press in 2019.

By |Tags: |

TME #22: ‘The Promised Land’, Paul McDonald

Paul McDonald is a socially engaged artist and educator whose practice explores masculinity and mental health. He was recently commissioned by ‘The Dax Centre’ Melbourne and BridgingHope Charity to produce and exhibit his first major solo exhibition ‘resonance’ in response to the Cunningham Dax Collection. The Cunningham Dax Collection consists of more than 16,000 artworks created by people who have experienced mental illness or psychological trauma.

By |Tags: |

TME #20: ‘KX’, JaiRujira Jaru

JaiRujira Jaru was given her first disposable camera about 5 years ago by Homeless and Focus, a small network of socially active photographers, who, in recognising JaiRujira’s abilities and desire to progress, encouraged her to go digital and take her photography further. These same Homeless and Focus members became mentors; “they invested in me, believed in me. I’ve learnt that there are many perspectives to things we see, things we hear.”

By |Tags: |

TME #18: ‘Corporate Highway’, Martin Roberts

Martin is a textile and mixed media artist, as well as being an Art therapist, who lives and works in the Blue Mountains outside Sydney. Studying a Master of Art Therapy was for Martin a life-changing experience: “I began to understand the power of art to express and heal. Working as an art therapist has taught me to consider things in a much deeper way.”

By |Tags: |

TME #17: ‘Stillness Through Art’, Sofie Dieu

Sofie Dieu is a first generation Australian woman; she arrived in Australia just after Black Saturday in February, 2009 and it shook her profoundly. Since then, she has worked as an artist with communities deeply impacted by bushfires and drought. Her own practice and that practice she teaches is self-exploratory and embedded in the numinous – or spirituality.

By |Tags: |

TME SPEAKER SERIES: Katherine Boydell on ‘Arts Based Knowledge Translation’

Katherine Boydell is a Professor of Mental Health and heads the Arts-based Knowledge Translation (AKT) Lab at the Black Dog Institute. Her background is in community health and epidemiology and qualitative sociology. She spoke to Gail Kenning about Arts-based approaches to research, the power of the arts, and how the time is right to highlight how arts have - and can help during the pandemic, and in other times of crises.

By |

TME #15: ‘Self’, Sarah Kingwell

Sarah Kingwell describes herself as an abstract self-expressionist, although she doesn’t really call herself an ‘Artist’, but instead she is “just a unique human being like everyone else who finds passion in self-expression.” For her, art has always been a way to express what she cannot say in words. Her dream is to share her passion and support others through recovery using different forms of artistic expression, “creating something beautiful even when it's hard to see the beauty.”

By |Tags: |

TME #14: ‘Roadkill’, Abigail Hammond

Abigail worked as a costume designer predominantly in contemporary dance for over 30 years, after first training in dance theatre. Later she became Course Leader for BA Hons Theatre and Screen: Costume Design at Wimbledon College and, in 2017, was made redundant. This became a transformative experience, and she re-focused her creative life.

By |Tags: |

TME #13: ‘Negotiation Between Madness & Sanity’, Zeynep Dagli

Zeynep Dagli's experimental short films have been exhibited in the UK and internationally. Her works have entailed collaborating with disabled artists, performers, scriptwriters, musicians and sound designers. 'Negotiation between Madness and Sanity' is a collaborative project that involves screaming without restraint. It proposes to engage directly with our right to scream as an attempt for a negotiation between what we call madness and sanity.

By |Tags: |

TME SPEAKER SERIES: Jill Bennett on ‘The Role of Art in Health’

The first speaker in our series for 'The Making Effect' is Scientia Professor Jill Bennett Australian Research Council Laureate Fellow. She founded 'The Big Anxiety – festival of people + art + science', a research-driven, mental health festival and leads fEEL (felt Experience and Empathy Lab) at University of New South Wales working across disciplines to explore the important role art has in supporting mental health, trauma and anxiety. Gail Kenning met up with Jill and asked her about the role of art in health and about some projects that engaged with anxiety, stress and trauma.

By |

TME #8: ‘ Dissimilitude’, Melanie Gray

Melanie Gray is a portrait and figurative artist whose work was recently hung as part of the 2020 Archibald Prize. In this portrait of her youngest daughter, Melanie uses her art making practice as a way to strongly reflect on Grace’s experience with ADHD of both recovery and resilience - which particularly during this time of COVID-19, can be extremely difficult for people with neurodivergent conditions.

By |Tags: |

TME #7: ‘My Inner Child Audrey’, Tracy Stirzaker

Contemporary visual artist Tracy Stirzaker sees herself as an observer and critic of contemporary Australian society and is inspired by her lived experience. Stirzaker uses the repetition of motifs in her artwork to explore the emotional body and self-esteem within the everyday constraints of social politics, cultural values and beliefs. Employing painting and textiles techniques including text, hand stitch, soft sculpture, applique and embroidery her artworks analyze and critique her life and thus reflect today’s Australian society.

By |Tags: |

TME #6: ‘Ecology No. 5’, Angie Contini

Angie is an experimental multimedia artist and independent scholar. Her works featured here are part of a collage series called 'Ecology'. This series is in response to Angie’s eco-anxiety: "Through collage you can actively meditate on the possibility of rewriting human-centric beliefs through creative imagery". Angie only uses recycled materials for these works.

By |Tags: |

TME #5: ‘Guwiyang the Lightening Fire Tree’, Liz Belanjee Cameron

Professor Liz Cameron is an artist who explores identity, cultural knowledges and healing through the human-nature connections. She is also Chair of Indigenous Knowledges in the School of Communications and Creative Arts, Faculty of Arts and Education at Deakin University. 'Guwiyang the Lightning Fire Tree' - the storyline is how an old tree takes on the form of lightning which glows at night within its stem and leaves.

By |Tags: |

TME # 4: ‘Animal in me’, Jessica K Ballantyne

Jessica Ballantyne's series 'Animal in You' is based around inkblots and subjective experience. This was created during lockdown, the artworks are about subconscious symbolism and the meaning we can find through self-exploration and conversation with others. They are collaborative and offer those who want to interpret an inkblot and work with the artist, the opportunity to create an oil painting based on their vision.

By |Tags: |

TME #3: ‘my brother’s hand’, Michele Elliot

Michele Elliot works with installation, textiles, drawing and sculpture. She describes her practice-led art-based research as material explorations in relation to human connectivity, mapping and memory. This work, 'my brother's hand' is a sombre refection of the impact the bushfires have had, hand-crafted from gathered charcoal and a garment that reminds us of a hospital gown. Poignant indeed.

By |Tags: |

ARTICLES

CATEGORIES

Join the AHNNA Network

Join the AHNNA network to receive email updates when new articles are posted. Your email will also be added to our email list to inform you of any upcoming events and/or initiatives. You can unsubscribe at any time using the link at the bottom of the email. By proceeding you agree to these terms of use.

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THE MAKING EFFECT ONLINE EXHIBITION

  • ABOUT THE MAKING EFFECT

    What role can the Arts play in the process of recovery? For the month of November, the Arts Health Network (AHNNA) is hosting an online exhibition here and social media. Works and artists' stories will be posted daily, exploring how the process of making art has influenced their own journey of recovery.

    Read more...

THE WORKS

TME #32: ‘Crazy Wall – a work in progress’, Elaine Paton

Elaine is a writer, director and performer, who came to Australia from Wales in 1980 to join a theatre company. Elaine has returned to Wales over time and we have already seen in this exhibition the artistic output of one of those return journeys in her video ‘Moment(o)s Of Leaving’, set in the former Psychiatric Hospital, Whitchurch. Elaine considers her work as an artist to “live at the intersection of art and mental health.” In this work in progress, ‘Crazy Wall’, Elaine investigates connectedness, isolation and identity.

By |Tags: |

TME SPEAKER SERIES: Niki Read on ‘Art, Death & Dying’

Niki Read of The Groundswell Project talks about social aspects of death and dying and how art acts as a way to access difficult conversations about quality of life in death, and quality of bereavement. She discusses the Creative Legacy Project in times of COVID and how it supports people receiving palliative care, family members and staff. “Art opens up spaces for people to enter into”.

By |Tags: |

TME #31: ‘The Burden of Proof/Everything Important is Invisible’, Michelle Jersky

Michelle Jersky is the Program Manager: Arts in Health and Community Development at Sydney Children’s Hospitals Network (Randwick). From 2009-2019 she facilitated the Ngala Nanga Mai pARenT Group Program in La Perouse – the program is now coordinated by an Aboriginal Health Worker, previously a group participant. She creates art as part of her professional practice and identity as a woman, mother, and feminist.

By |Tags: |

TME #29: ‘Wonky Duck’, Maree Hackett

Maree Hackett is a Professor, Program Head, Mental Health, with the George Institute of Global Health and an occasional artist. As a researcher, she studies depression, stroke and other chronic illnesses. As an artist she mostly draws with dots (pointillism), but sometimes sketches and paints.

By |Tags: |

TME #28: ‘Roberta Shepherd, AO’, Michael Simms

Michael Simms is a multi-award-winning artist based in Sydney, whose work is characterized by dream-like depictions of the human figure. Ranging from traditional portraiture to explorations of identity in the digital age and queer culture, his diverse paintings and drawings combine elements of classicism, romanticism, surrealism and psychology.

By |Tags: |

TME #27: jorvn jones’ infinity loop presents: jorvn jones’ silla de ruedas: “Bastinado Beats”

jorvn jones is an Artist, writer, performer, composer, dancer and auteur who works across cultures to explore evolving Masculinities, including third gender, non-binary, ‘in spandula’ and ‘iiS’. His (Y’all) work is personal and poetic, and iiS. “Bastinado Beats” was a dance piece in response to his in residence at Paringa mental health facility in Sydney’s West.

By |Tags: |

TME #26: ‘Happy Memories’, Yusra Alkeswani

Yusra Alkeswani participated in the Groundswell Project and Liverpool Hospital’s partnership program, delivered by artists in the palliative care ward. Our Creative Legacy Program is an award-winning arts and health experience that combines storytelling and art making on an acute Palliative Care ward. Through conversation and story-telling exercises the artist captures the life stories of people in the last days and weeks of their life in personalised artworks, which are then given to the patient and their family as a gift of art and legacy. 

By |Tags: |

TME #25: ‘Looking In Looking Out’, Kress Lagudi

Kress Lagudi's work evolved through the use of textiles; with an emphasis on patterns, textures & colours. Now it is in the form of paint and she is currently exploring the themes of gardens. These two works come from her participation in Liverpool Hospital’s “Our Creative Legacy Program”, a palliative care initiative involving patients, their memories and artists. Kress addressed staff concerns rather than those of patients. She asked a series of questions about the staff’s experience of lockdown. Staff members recorded their experiences and Kress created these works from their responses.

By |Tags: |

TME #24: ‘Grief Selfportrait’, Armelle Swan MFA

Armelle Swan is a Sydney based artist specialising in painting. She has a BFA (Hons I) and MFA from Sydney College of the Arts, University of Sydney. Formerly an emergency nurse, she gave up that career in the ‘90s to focus on her art; however, she considers her experiences in that role were seminal for later thinking and making. So, she brings to bear scholarly interests, such as the nexus of art and health in notions of visual thinking, brain, mind and neurology, to any making.

By |Tags: |

TME #23: ‘And Now That Can’t Hurt Me Anymore’, Guy James Whitworth

Guy is a British writer and visual artist now resident in Australia. Primarily a portrait artist, Guy has also completed both architectural and landscape commissions. Guy’s solo exhibitions have been a huge hit with both the public, collectors and critics, with ABC online calling him ‘one of the most promising and collectible artists’ around at the moment. Over the past few years Guy has also turned to documentary film, making “A Queer Aesthetic” to promote his work and his message. Guy’s first book, Signs of a Struggle was published by Clouds of Magellan Press in 2019.

By |Tags: |

TME #22: ‘The Promised Land’, Paul McDonald

Paul McDonald is a socially engaged artist and educator whose practice explores masculinity and mental health. He was recently commissioned by ‘The Dax Centre’ Melbourne and BridgingHope Charity to produce and exhibit his first major solo exhibition ‘resonance’ in response to the Cunningham Dax Collection. The Cunningham Dax Collection consists of more than 16,000 artworks created by people who have experienced mental illness or psychological trauma.

By |Tags: |

TME #20: ‘KX’, JaiRujira Jaru

JaiRujira Jaru was given her first disposable camera about 5 years ago by Homeless and Focus, a small network of socially active photographers, who, in recognising JaiRujira’s abilities and desire to progress, encouraged her to go digital and take her photography further. These same Homeless and Focus members became mentors; “they invested in me, believed in me. I’ve learnt that there are many perspectives to things we see, things we hear.”

By |Tags: |

TME #18: ‘Corporate Highway’, Martin Roberts

Martin is a textile and mixed media artist, as well as being an Art therapist, who lives and works in the Blue Mountains outside Sydney. Studying a Master of Art Therapy was for Martin a life-changing experience: “I began to understand the power of art to express and heal. Working as an art therapist has taught me to consider things in a much deeper way.”

By |Tags: |

TME #17: ‘Stillness Through Art’, Sofie Dieu

Sofie Dieu is a first generation Australian woman; she arrived in Australia just after Black Saturday in February, 2009 and it shook her profoundly. Since then, she has worked as an artist with communities deeply impacted by bushfires and drought. Her own practice and that practice she teaches is self-exploratory and embedded in the numinous – or spirituality.

By |Tags: |

TME SPEAKER SERIES: Katherine Boydell on ‘Arts Based Knowledge Translation’

Katherine Boydell is a Professor of Mental Health and heads the Arts-based Knowledge Translation (AKT) Lab at the Black Dog Institute. Her background is in community health and epidemiology and qualitative sociology. She spoke to Gail Kenning about Arts-based approaches to research, the power of the arts, and how the time is right to highlight how arts have - and can help during the pandemic, and in other times of crises.

By |

TME #15: ‘Self’, Sarah Kingwell

Sarah Kingwell describes herself as an abstract self-expressionist, although she doesn’t really call herself an ‘Artist’, but instead she is “just a unique human being like everyone else who finds passion in self-expression.” For her, art has always been a way to express what she cannot say in words. Her dream is to share her passion and support others through recovery using different forms of artistic expression, “creating something beautiful even when it's hard to see the beauty.”

By |Tags: |

TME #14: ‘Roadkill’, Abigail Hammond

Abigail worked as a costume designer predominantly in contemporary dance for over 30 years, after first training in dance theatre. Later she became Course Leader for BA Hons Theatre and Screen: Costume Design at Wimbledon College and, in 2017, was made redundant. This became a transformative experience, and she re-focused her creative life.

By |Tags: |

TME #13: ‘Negotiation Between Madness & Sanity’, Zeynep Dagli

Zeynep Dagli's experimental short films have been exhibited in the UK and internationally. Her works have entailed collaborating with disabled artists, performers, scriptwriters, musicians and sound designers. 'Negotiation between Madness and Sanity' is a collaborative project that involves screaming without restraint. It proposes to engage directly with our right to scream as an attempt for a negotiation between what we call madness and sanity.

By |Tags: |

TME SPEAKER SERIES: Jill Bennett on ‘The Role of Art in Health’

The first speaker in our series for 'The Making Effect' is Scientia Professor Jill Bennett Australian Research Council Laureate Fellow. She founded 'The Big Anxiety – festival of people + art + science', a research-driven, mental health festival and leads fEEL (felt Experience and Empathy Lab) at University of New South Wales working across disciplines to explore the important role art has in supporting mental health, trauma and anxiety. Gail Kenning met up with Jill and asked her about the role of art in health and about some projects that engaged with anxiety, stress and trauma.

By |

TME #8: ‘ Dissimilitude’, Melanie Gray

Melanie Gray is a portrait and figurative artist whose work was recently hung as part of the 2020 Archibald Prize. In this portrait of her youngest daughter, Melanie uses her art making practice as a way to strongly reflect on Grace’s experience with ADHD of both recovery and resilience - which particularly during this time of COVID-19, can be extremely difficult for people with neurodivergent conditions.

By |Tags: |

TME #7: ‘My Inner Child Audrey’, Tracy Stirzaker

Contemporary visual artist Tracy Stirzaker sees herself as an observer and critic of contemporary Australian society and is inspired by her lived experience. Stirzaker uses the repetition of motifs in her artwork to explore the emotional body and self-esteem within the everyday constraints of social politics, cultural values and beliefs. Employing painting and textiles techniques including text, hand stitch, soft sculpture, applique and embroidery her artworks analyze and critique her life and thus reflect today’s Australian society.

By |Tags: |

TME #6: ‘Ecology No. 5’, Angie Contini

Angie is an experimental multimedia artist and independent scholar. Her works featured here are part of a collage series called 'Ecology'. This series is in response to Angie’s eco-anxiety: "Through collage you can actively meditate on the possibility of rewriting human-centric beliefs through creative imagery". Angie only uses recycled materials for these works.

By |Tags: |

TME #5: ‘Guwiyang the Lightening Fire Tree’, Liz Belanjee Cameron

Professor Liz Cameron is an artist who explores identity, cultural knowledges and healing through the human-nature connections. She is also Chair of Indigenous Knowledges in the School of Communications and Creative Arts, Faculty of Arts and Education at Deakin University. 'Guwiyang the Lightning Fire Tree' - the storyline is how an old tree takes on the form of lightning which glows at night within its stem and leaves.

By |Tags: |

TME # 4: ‘Animal in me’, Jessica K Ballantyne

Jessica Ballantyne's series 'Animal in You' is based around inkblots and subjective experience. This was created during lockdown, the artworks are about subconscious symbolism and the meaning we can find through self-exploration and conversation with others. They are collaborative and offer those who want to interpret an inkblot and work with the artist, the opportunity to create an oil painting based on their vision.

By |Tags: |

TME #3: ‘my brother’s hand’, Michele Elliot

Michele Elliot works with installation, textiles, drawing and sculpture. She describes her practice-led art-based research as material explorations in relation to human connectivity, mapping and memory. This work, 'my brother's hand' is a sombre refection of the impact the bushfires have had, hand-crafted from gathered charcoal and a garment that reminds us of a hospital gown. Poignant indeed.

By |Tags: |

ARTICLES

CATEGORIES

Join the AHNNA Network

Join the AHNNA network to receive email updates when new articles are posted. Your email will also be added to our email list to inform you of any upcoming events and/or initiatives. You can unsubscribe at any time using the link at the bottom of the email. By proceeding you agree to these terms of use.

CONTRIBUTE

 
SUBMIT AN ARTICLE

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